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Spinal cord injuries are expensive, but help is available

Whether it is caused by a car crash, a fall or a sporting accident, those in the Amelia area who suffer a spinal cord injury may find their entire world has been turned upside. Not only may they be unable to work or even perform basic daily tasks but living with a spinal cord injury can be prohibitively expensive. Fortunately, those who suffer a spinal cord injury may be able to pursue Social Security disability benefits, which could be the financial lifeline they need to meet their daily care needs.

What are the costs of living with a spinal cord injury?

The costs associated with a spinal cord injury can be astronomic. For example, a person with high tetraplegia may incur approximately $1 million in medical expenses solely in the first year of their injury. A person with low tetraplegia can expect to incur approximately $769,000 in medical expenses the first year of their injury. A person with paraplegia may incur approximately $518,000 in medical expenses the first year of their injury. Finally, a person with an injury that causes any level of incomplete motor function can expect to incur approximately $347,000 in medical expenses the first year of their injury.

Medical expenses are not the only costs associated with a spinal cord injury. Many spinal cord injury victims are unable to work, leading to lost wages and lost earning potential. Only 11.7% of spinal cord injury victims are able to work at one year following their injury. Moreover, only 35.2% of spinal cord injury victims are able to work at 20 years following their injury. A person injured at age 25 who expected to work until age 65 could potentially lose approximately $1 million in lost earning potential.

Those with a spinal cord injury can seek SSD benefits

As this shows, many people with spinal cord injuries desperately need SSD benefits to make ends meet if their condition prevents them from working. To qualify, a person must meet certain eligibility factors.

First, a person may qualify if they have a complete loss of function persisting for three months in a row following their injury.

Second, a person may qualify if they have disorganized motor function in two extremities for three months in a row following their injury that extremely limits their ability to stand up from a seated position, keep their balance or use their upper extremities.

Finally, a person may qualify if they have a marked limitation persisting for three months in a row following their injury in physical functioning and mental function including either understanding, remembering or applying information; or interacting with others; or persistent concentration or pace maintenance issues; or adapting or managing themselves.

Learn more about applying for SSD benefits

While many people in Ohio with spinal cord injuries desperately need SSD benefits, the application process can be complicated. This post is for educational purposes only and does not contain legal advice. Those who need assistance in applying for SSD benefits are encouraged to visit our firm’s website for further information.